Assessing reliability of an online behavioural laterality battery: A task repository

The materials were used for a study in which we established the relaibility for an online bheavioural laterality battery.

From Parker et al. (2020): "Studies of cerebral lateralization often involve participants completing a series of perceptual tasks under laboratory conditions. This has constrained the number of participants recruited in such studies. Online testing can allow for much larger sample sizes but limits the amount of experimental control that is feasible. Here we considered whether online testing could give valid and reliable results on four tasks: a rhyme decision visual half-field task, a dichotic listening task, a chimeric faces task, and a finger tapping task. We recruited 392 participants, oversampling left-handers, who completed the battery twice. Three of the tasks showed evidence of both validity and reliability, insofar as they showed hemispheric advantages in the expected direction and test-retest reliability of at least r = .75. The reliability of the rhyme decision task was less satisfactory (r = .62). We also confirmed a prediction that extreme left-handers were more likely to depart from typical lateralization. Lateralization across the two language tasks (dichotic listening and rhyme judgement) was weakly correlated, but unrelated to lateralization on the chimeric faces task. We conclude that three of the tasks, dichotic listening, chimeric faces and finger tapping, show considerable promise for online evaluation of cerebral lateralization."

This Gorilla Open Materials includes:

  • a basic demographics questionnaire,
  • the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory,
  • tests of ocular dominance,
  • the LexTALE,
  • a consonant-vowel dichotic listening task,
  • a chimeric faces task,
  • a finger tapping task.

This project remains active and we are currently undertaking research to increase the reliability of the rhyme task. We hope to make this available in the future.

We would like to make it clear that the stimuli for the dichotic listening task were provided by Professor Kenneth Hugdahl and Dr Josef Bless. Stimuli for the dichotic listening task were provided by Dr Michael Burt.

The stimuli and processing scripts are also available on the Open Science Framework.

When using any of the tasks, it is essential that you cite the references provided.

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Demographics Questionnaire

A basic demographics questionnaire used to obtain participants' age, gender, and age on leaving full time education.

We also asked a question of hand and foot preference.

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Edinburgh Handedness Inventory

The Edinburgh Handedness Inventory (Oldfield, 1971) was administered to quantify handedness on a continuum. Participants indicated their preferred hand use on a 5-step scale for 10 activities.

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Oldfield, R. C. (1971). Neuropsychologia, 9, 97-113.
https://doi.org/10.1016/0028-3932(71)90067-4


Lexical Test for Advanced Learners of English (LexTALE)

We used a digitialised version of the LexTALE (Lemhöfer, & Broersma, 2012) to screen participants for an advanced level of proficiency. The test is a lexical decision task containing 60 trials.

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Lemhöfer, K., & Broersma, M. (2012).Behavior research methods, 44, 325-343.
https://doi.org/10.3758/s13428-011-0146-0


Miles Test

This is an adapted version of the Miles test (Miles, 1929). We included the Miles test in our battery to assess participants' eye dominance in central gaze (i.e., when looking straight ahead). Participants were classified as being either left or right eye dominant.

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Miles, W. R. (1929). Journal of experimental psychology, 12, 113.
https://doi.org/10.1037/h0075694


Porta Test

This is an adapted version of the Porta test (Porac & Coren, 1976). We included the Porta test in our battery to assess participants' eye dominance in central gaze (i.e., when looking straight ahead). Participants were classified as being either left or right eye dominant.

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Porac, C., & Coren, S. (1976). Psychological bulletin, 83, 880.
https://doi.org/10.1037/0033-2909.83.5.880


Headphone check

This is an adapted version of the task reported by Wood et al. (2017). It was used to assess adherence to headphone use as headphones are essential for the dichotic listening task.

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Woods, K.J.P., Siegel, M.H., Traer, J, & McDermott, J. H. (2017). Attention, Perception, and Psychophysics, 79, 2064–2072
https://doi.org/10.3758/s13414-017-1361-2


Stereo check

This simple headphone check ensures that participants are using stereo headphones. Participants hear a sound in a single channel in each ear and then report the side it was presented to. This ensures that headphones are able to run the dichotic listening task.

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Chimeric faces

This task was used to assess the lateralisation of emotion processing in faces. Here, participants see a chimeric face and report which one of four emotions they felt was displayed the strongest (happiness, sadness, anger, or disgust).

The stimuli were provided by Dr Michael Burt and have been reported elsewhere. Please cite the below articles if you wish to use this task.

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Burt, D. M. & Perrett, D. I. (1997). Neuropsychologia, 35, 685-693.
https://doi.org/10.1016/S0028-3932(96)00111-X

Innes, R. B., Burt, D. M., Birch, Y. K. & Hausmann, M. (2016). Laterality, 21, 643-661.
https://doi.org/10.1080/1357650X.2015.1117095


Dichotic Listening

This task was used to assess the lateralisation of language processing. Here, participants hear different syllables in each ear. They report the syllable they heard the clearest.

The stimuli were provided by Professor Kenneth Hugdahl and Dr Josef Bless and have been reported elsewhere. Please cite the below articles if you wish to use this task.

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Bless, J. J., Westerhausen, R., Arciuli, J., Kompus, K., Gudmundsen, M., & Hugdahl, K. (2013). Frontiers in Psychology, 4, 42.
https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00042

Hugdahl, K., & Andersson, L. (1986). Cortex, 22, 417-432.
https://doi.org/10.1016/S0010-9452(86)80005-3


Finger Tapping

This finger tapping task was administered to assess manual preference. In this task, participants tapped out a sequence of keys as many times as possible within 30 second. This was repeated four times for each hand.

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Preferred Citation Adam J. Parker, Zoe V. J. Woodhead, Paul A. Thompson & Dorothy V. M. Bishop (2020) Assessing the reliability of an online behavioural laterality battery: A pre-registered study, Laterality.
https://doi.org/10.1080/1357650X.2020.1859526


Conducted at Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford.
Published on 07 August 2020
Corresponding author Dr Adam Parker Postdoctoral Research Associate
Experimental Psychology
University of Oxford